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TOPIC: New here and looking for advice

New here and looking for advice 07 Oct 2019 16:39 #21004


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  • GDrewry's Avatar
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New here. I've been out of the 928 fellowship for almost 20 years now and am looking to return. I've got a 1984 S 5sp. It needs a lot of work to get it running again, but the body is in pretty good shape as I've had it parked in a storage unit since I parked it. I parked it because the shift bushings wore out and I was in college and didn't have the money to keep it on the road. I was fortunate to have another vehicle and the means to keep it parked all this time. I don't recall exactly, but I think I recall the mileage being in the low 100's. I'm looking to restore it as it holds quite a bit of sentimental value. I'm looking for advice on the order in which I should do things. I'm thinking an engine tear down is necessary given the amount of time it's been sitting. I'm considering doing a rebuild or upgrade (to possibly a 32V) motor. Pretty sure the latter would require a newer computer/fuel management system. I know I'm going to need to redo a lot of bushings, seals, etc. I'm guessing I'll need to replace the master cylinder, replace the fuel tank, fuel pump and possibly the fuel lines. The interior will need a complete rework.

I realize this isn't going to be cheap, or quick. I'm looking to do things in stages. I'm hoping those with experience can advise of a good order.

Additionally, I'm in Knoxville, Tennessee and didn't know if anyone knew of a reputable place within a few hours drive that would be a good candidate to perform much of said work.

I'm looking forward to rejoining the community and hopefully in the next couple of years be on the road again.

Thanks,

Greg
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New here and looking for advice 14 Oct 2019 10:08 #21012


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Welcome Greg,
Looking to resurrect your toy, you have lots of fun times ahead.
I too left my '82 sitting for 19 years and paid the price to bring it back. You will definitely need to replace the fuel pump and fuel filter, that is easily accomplished yourself - no need to have a repair shop do it. You will probably need to have the fuel distributor rebuilt as well - at least mine needed that. The fuel tank can be removed and cleaned out. A word of warning here, the tank is very fragile and its removal should be done by someone who really knows how to work on old Porsches because the tank can be damaged easily and a replacement tank is very expensive. You should also do a full tune up including the timing belt, tensioner, water pump, cam and crank seals, spark plugs, plug wires, distributor cap, etc. You should also replace the old antifreeze, 20 year old antifreeze has no anticorrosion chemicals left. Since your brake fluid is 20+ years old, you are correct in assuming the master cylinder and slave cylinder will probably need to be replaced. The brake caliper cylinders are fairly easy to do yourself with a $10 kit. Since the oil has been sitting for 20 years, you should drain it, refill with fresh oil and filter. Start and let it idle until the oil has warmed up, drain the oil and replace with fresh oil and filter. I should mention that if the last time you filled it up was 20 years ago, you may not have as many fuel system problems because they didn't add ethanol to fuel back in the day. From what I understand from mechanics, it's the ethanol that causes problems with the fuel system. Once you have the car running, you will want to check the power steering hoses, both of mine were leaking - they are cheap and relatively easy to replace. The power steering on these cars use transmission fluid which is flammable and the hoses are right over the exhaust manifold. Finally, your motor mounts are probably completely shot after 35 years - it's a job you can do yourself in a weekend. You should check the technical resources on this website.

As to changing motors, that's a matter of personal preference. 928 motors are fairly bulletproof if they are maintained. After mine was resurrected, it runs great, doesn't burn oil, and seems to be reliable. If you can hear any rod noise once the engine is running, then you would want to consider disassembly. If you want more power, you could opt for a '84 ROW 928S motor which has 300hp and wouldn't require any other changes. Just keep in mind that if you want a car that can keep up with a C8 on the track, it's going to be very expensive and severely impact reliability.
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New here and looking for advice 08 Nov 2019 01:18 #21039


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Good advice has been given. Regarding changing to a 32 valve engine, you would be well ahead just buying a good running 928 S4 and be done with it. There are so many difference between the old and newer 928s you would need a newer parts car for all the bits. For the cost involved you could have purchased a whole other car.

The 1980 - 1984 L-Jetronic 928s are good running cars and when kept up are quite reliable. They may be down on power compared to the newer 928s, but they'll still cruise at over legal speeds.
Rich
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1993 928 GTS Cover Girl
1987 928 S4
1979 928 5-speed rescue
1979 928 5-liter track beast
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